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Blu Ray Discs About Blu Ray Disks

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Blu Ray discs were introduced in year 2002 when a group of firms announced about this new format of storage over discs. These discs are new standard for storing data over removable disks like CD and DVD. A single layer blu ray disc (BRD) can store up to 25 GB where as double layer disk can store 50 GB of data.Currently DVD writing is supported by BRD video products. A DVD player can not read BRD as BRD as the pits in BRDs are finer than those of DVDs and as standard follows, BRD drives will be able to play DVDs and CDs.Data transfer rate in BRDs is 36 Mbps as compared to 10 Mbps of DVDs. As far as recent developments are concerned, JVC has developed a Blu-ray/DVD combo disc with an approximate 33.5-GB capacity.In these last 6 years, more than 20 big companies have joined the Blu Ray Disc group and have involved in its production. The major companies in this forum are -HPDELLPHILIPSSONYSHARPTHOMSONHITACHITDKAPPLESAMSUNGPANASONICLGAnd the contributors include -AdobeFuji Photo Film Co. Ltd.CanonNeroLITE-ON IT CorporationBroadcom

Edited by nitesh (see edit history)

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Ehh....im not to crazy about them. The blue ray disks are the reason why the PS3 is about 600 dollars. Ya they hold a lot more and you can have better graphics on them but their very exspencive which is why the PS3 should of stuck with the same disks they were using. As for holding music and videos i would say it does a great job but for games....no way. I did have a case of blue rays and i used them for music and i was able to hold over 70 songs on it, as for movies it may be a little hard to beleave but i was able to hold 2 movies on one disk. Overall there are really nice for music and movies, as for games they wont be making a lot of money cause their to exspensive.

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This is one of the major problems with the new technology, cost. If only these kinds of things weren't that expensive, many people would be using systems like the ps3 which are really expensive.I'm sure the prices will go down eventually though, once new products are out. I think it's probably just the manufacturers trying to snatch money.

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I always did wonder why the backs of some CDs for the Playstation 2 were blue and why some were still regular. Now I finally know it is for more storage. I like the idea of storing that much more data. Of course it is going to cost more though because it holds more which might also mean the game has some extra quality or just more levels who knows. I like the idea of having 2GB in a CD that would be pretty cool, store a bunch of stuff in there.

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I always did wonder why the backs of some CDs for the Playstation 2 were blue and why some were still regular. Now I finally know it is for more storage. I like the idea of storing that much more data. Of course it is going to cost more though because it holds more which might also mean the game has some extra quality or just more levels who knows. I like the idea of having 2GB in a CD that would be pretty cool, store a bunch of stuff in there.

I'm not trying to crush your post but are you sure thats right, I'm pretty sure that Playstation 2 can't do blu-ray discs, although I was never really sure whether those ones with the purple backing were special in some way!!! I may well be wrong but isn't it just something to make them look nicer.. ( EDIT: Maybe a scratch-resistant coating for those who like to lob their discs around..? ) - just give em a shiny blue coating :) I don't really like the idea of blu-ray discs because of costs. Much later on though, once thye have dropped it would be worth moving across but DVD-RAM and Dual layer DVD will more than suffice for me at the moment :P it just doesn't seem worth the hassle to go converting every product / computer / DVD player with a disc drive to be able to read - letalone write those discs... Edited by Jimmy (see edit history)

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Fun fact: Blu-ray will fail like so many other Sony proprietary formats: Betamax, MiniDisc, SDDS, UMD, etc.


I agree, they will also be fragile due to the close spacing of the lines and the finely tuned and trued intenal disk spindle. Thats what i have heard

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Yes, Sony took over BlueRay for there console, Playstation 3. I think it is quite useful having 50 - 60 GB disk to hold the PS3 games, but I don't like to look of the price. But we'll have to wait and see what Sony do about it.

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It is true that the prices will eventually fall. In the manufacturing industry, the higher the demand, the lower the prices will get. So hold on guys and gals, just be patient and wait out.I think BlueRay is becoming more and more needed considering computers nowadays are going way past gigabytes and just about going over terabytes. Its essential to have a high-capacity medium for your backups. :)

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Blu-ray, also known as Blu-ray Disc (BD), is the name of a next-generation optical disc format jointly developed by the Blu-ray Disc Association (BDA), a group of the world's leading consumer electronics, personal computer and media manufacturers (including Apple, Dell, Hitachi, HP, JVC, LG, Mitsubishi, Panasonic, Pioneer, Philips, Samsung, Sharp, Sony, TDK and Thomson). The format was developed to enable recording, rewriting and playback of high-definition video (HD), as well as storing large amounts of data. The format offers more than five times the storage capacity of traditional DVDs and can hold up to 25GB on a single-layer disc and 50GB on a dual-layer disc. This extra capacity combined with the use of advanced video and audio codecs will offer consumers an unprecedented HD experience.
While current optical disc technologies such as DVD, DVDąR, DVDąRW, and DVD-RAM rely on a red laser to read and write data, the new format uses a blue-violet laser instead, hence the name Blu-ray. Despite the different type of lasers used, Blu-ray products can easily be made backwards compatible with CDs and DVDs through the use of a BD/DVD/CD compatible optical pickup unit. The benefit of using a blue-violet laser (405nm) is that it has a shorter wavelength than a red laser (650nm), which makes it possible to focus the laser spot with even greater precision. This allows data to be packed more tightly and stored in less space, so it's possible to fit more data on the disc even though it's the same size as a CD/DVD. This together with the change of numerical aperture to 0.85 is what enables Blu-ray Discs to hold 25GB/50GB.

Blu-ray is currently supported by more than 170 of the world's leading consumer electronics, personal computer, recording media, video game and music companies. The format also has broad support from the major movie studios as a successor to today's DVD format. Seven of the eight major movie studios have already announced titles for Blu-ray, including Warner, Paramount, Fox, Disney, Sony, MGM and Lionsgate. The initial line-up is expected to consist of over 100 titles and include recent hits as well as classics such as Batman Begins, Desperado, Fantastic Four, Fifth Element, Hero, Ice Age, Kill Bill, Lethal Weapon, Mission Impossible, Ocean's Twelve, Pirates of the Caribbean, Reservoir Dogs, Robocop, and The Matrix. Many studios have also announced that they will begin releasing new feature films on Blu-ray Disc day-and-date with DVD, as well as a continuous slate of catalog titles every month.


Notice from serverph:
COPIED CONTENT from http://www.blu-ray.com/info/
quotes added. MEMBER SUSPENDED INDEFINITELY for continuous violations of Xisto forum rules & TOS.

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Over 9 hours of high-definition (HD) video on a 50GB disc. About 23 hours of standard-definition (SD) video on a 50GB disc.TDK recently announced that they have created a working Blu-ray disc capable of holding 200GB of data (six 33GB data layers).

VIDEO:

The codecs are compression schemes used to store audio and video information on disc. For video, all BD-ROM players must be able to decode three codecs: MPEG-2 (the standard also used for DVDs); MPEG-4's H.264/AVC; and VC-1, a codec based on Microsoft's Windows Media 9.

All Blu-ray movies released so far have chosen to use the ten year old MPEG-2 technology (that all standard DVDs use) rather than the much newer VC-1 compression technology that most HD-DVD movies use. A 25GB single layer Blu-ray disc using MPEG-2 holds two hours of high-definition video content, just like a 15GB single layer HD-DVD using VC-1 would hold two hours of high-definition video content. Most HD-DVD movies released so far use dual-layer 30GB discs that hold four hours of high-definition video content, while all Blu-ray movies released so far use a single-layer 25 GB disc that only hold two hours of high-definition video content. This is the main reason why Blu-ray discs have far fewer special features and bonus content than HD-DVD or standard DVD movies.

AUDIO:

For audio, BD-ROM players are required to support Dolby Digital and DTS, and linear PCM (up to 7.1 channels.) The standard has optional support for Dolby Digital Plus and the lossless formats Dolby TrueHD and DTS HD. The linear PCM 5.1, Dolby Digital 5.1 and DTS 5.1 formats are mandatory, meaning that one of them may be used as the sole soundtrack on a disc, because every player will have a decoder that can process any of these three bitstreams.[2] For lossless audio in movies in the PCM, Dolby TrueHD or DTS-HD formats, Blu-ray discs support encoding in up to 24-bit/192kHz for up to six channels, or up to eight channels of up to 24-bit/96kHz encoding.[3] For reference, even new big-budget Hollywood films are mastered in only 24-bit/48kHz, with 16-bit/48kHz being common for ordinary films.

For users recording digital television broadcasts, the Blu-ray's baseline datarate of 36 MB/s is more than adequate to record high-definition broadcasts. Support for new codecs will evolve as they are encapsulated by broadcasters into their MPEG-2 transport streams, and consumer set-top boxes capable of decoding them are rolled out.

The choice of codecs affects disc cost (due to related licensing/royalty payments) as well as program capacity. The two more advanced video codecs can typically achieve twice the video runtime of MPEG-2. When using MPEG-2, quality considerations would limit the publisher to around two hours of high-definition content on a single-layer (25GB) BD-ROM.

JAVA:

At the 2005 JavaOne trade show, it was announced that Sun Microsystems' Java cross-platform software environment would be included in all Blu-ray players as a mandatory part of the standard. Java will be used to implement interactive menus on Blu-ray discs, as opposed to the method used on DVD video discs, which uses pre-rendered MPEG segments and selectable subtitle pictures, which is considerably more primitive. Java creator James Gosling, at the conference, suggested that the inclusion of a Java virtual machine as well as network connectivity in BD devices will allow updates to Blu-ray discs via the Internet, adding content such as additional subtitle languages and promotional features that are not included on the disc at pressing time. This Java Version will be called BD-J and will be a subset of the Globally Executable MHP (GEM) standard. GEM is the world-wide version of the Multimedia Home Platform standard.

And the Region Codes are differents... There are less than before...

A North America, South America, East Asia except for China
B Europe and Africa
C China, Russia and other countries


Notice from serverph:
tsk...tsk...tsk... another COPIED CONTENT.
from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blu-ray_Disc
quotes added. credits reduced.

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Personaly i think hd dvd will be the preffered disk format, its cheaper and smaller but has a smaller disk space but for most thinks it is enough, i mean for a hd film hd dvd is much better, it can fit a hd movie on and its cheaper and smaller as i said, mabe for laptops the blu ray may be better because the more space required but still i think hd dvd will still cut it. Two hd dvds are smaller tan one blu ray disk and have more storage so i am a clear hd dvd supported, i also dont like the huge costs of the drives for the blu ray disks

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blu-ray isnt all that great....it will only affect you if you have like a 3000 dollar tv .....blu-ray company just gets about 1000+ dolars off of a player that cost them at most 100 dollars to make....coporations....

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Blu-ray's expensive, I guess, but in my humble opinion it's better than HDVD - sony also seems to have a track record for choosing the best new media, and I think that'll hold through with the Blu-Ray.

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I think it would be an advance on the movies and gaming industry, beacause of it's capasyty which will allow companies to use better grafics, longer games or more fectures.This new type of disk will imprube in som many things aldought i have recently bought an dvd-RW :)

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