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I Want To Get Linux, Which One Is Best?

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There are already several topics on this subject, you could have a look at them first.Linux is open-source, that means that the sources are available. But each version of Linux is not free.For example you have to pay for RedHat server Linux, whereas there are free versions from the same version of Linux.The true way of choosing depends from what you want to do, which material you have and how much effort you want to give to it.My personnal choice is Mandriva, the free version of Mandrake Linux. Unfortunately the free versions detects correctly my wifi adapter, but says that the drivers are available only in the commercial version. Of course, standard Ethernet connection is available in the free version and works perfectly. Also, if you don't want to change too much from MS-Windows to Linux, I would also recommend Mandriva.And of course, as usual in the open-source playground, a lot of people will have a completely different opinion.RegardsYordan ;)

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Indeed, most people prefer another flavor of linux and they all have good reasons for it ;) . Because linux (and most other programs) are open source, this means there are a lot of different versions available, all with different settings and preferences, that's why it's up to you to see which version is best for you.

Most common distributions are available as a live-cd too, you download it, burn it, pop it in your cd-drive, reboot and you have a full functionaly linux installation without it tampering with your hdd. If your not happy with it, simply reboot (remove the cd too :P) and you're back to windows.

 

Some suggestions:

Ubuntu: comes in different flavors (Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu), but the only real difference are the looks (GUI) and the applications that come with. It's the best for beginners, they have a hug knowledge base, a lot of users and a lot of developpers give instructions on how to install their software on this distribution.

openSuse: my favourite, it's both user friendly and advanced at the same time.

Mandrive: as suggested by yordan

Fedora: comes from the makers of Red Hat, it's not as easy as ubuntu and openSuse, but it robust and advanced.

Slackware: if you have a lot of time, this one is worth trying too. It's absolute not user friendly, but a very powerfull distribution is given to you instead. A lot of configuration has to be done to get it fully working, but when it's up and running, you'll be a very happy linux user ;)

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If you want a Linux that you can just install and not really worry about or learn anything then something like Ubuntu would be likely to fit your needs. If you really want to learn Linux and how it works then I can not over suggest Slackware. Sure its about as user friendly as a barbed wire g-string but once you get into it you will know how any Linux distribution is put together and can be modified. Of course there is the most extreme option of compiling your own kernel and going from there.

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Hey, linux is not a walk on a park OS like Windows. I have invested some amount of time to it and yet until now, Im still not quite familiar with all the install commands and the rest of the packages that needs to be installed. Its pretty much confusing when choosing a lot of flavors and distribution since not all Linux software runs easily like the EXE file in DOS/Windows. You need to learn a couple of installation methods or if you have a good internet connection, then your OK. Then you'll realize that working on linux means you'd become incompatible with the rest of the world that runs Windows softwares! Im not discouraging you or anything, its just the way it is..I suggest you try Ubuntu! It has good compatibility with everything. All the fancy stuff works and you can now brag around using something different other than a Mac and Windows. Yet, better stay with Bill. He's a good guy. ;)

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I agree with the previous post. It is indeed a bit complicated system that one has to get deeply involved with if planning to use all its capacities. Of course, if you plan only surfing and listening music on it - it's not so hard to learn. You will get rid of all kinds of spyware, worms, viruses etc. and you'll have a smooth surf with no worries. But if you plan on doing more than that, you'll have to learn a bit about it.I'm using Slackware, but in the past I used SuSE, RedHat, even Fedora, a little bit of KUbuntu, and I must say it's all about the same thing with little differences. It's more or less irrelevant which one you choose, but I'd recommend not choosing Slack since it's a little tricky when installing new programs, configuring drivers, updating software etc.

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I use OpenSUSE, it's a real balance between easy to use and all the power provided by any Linux distribution. Ubuntu doesn't offer you that when I last used it in 8.04.

I would even recommend PCBSD, it's a neat little FreeBSD distribution: http://www.pcbsd.org/ if power is not something you would really use.

I'm gonna pin this because a lot of people are going to ask.

xboxrulz

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I prefer mandriva one 2009, it looks good, works great and has a lot to offer, plus i never have trouble setting up my different wireless cards, second would be opensuse 10,or go for open solaris, it is a unixbased offering from sun... although wireless drivers are a problem or id be running it now

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My preferred was always Ubuntu since I switched to linux 4 years ago, it's an excellent friendly distro, it helped me so much to master linux since I was a newbie, I think simplicity wins here, this is the purpose Ubuntu was created for.I tried a lot of distros "fedora 10 was the last one I tried", none beats Ubuntu with its free 24/7 IRC support and forums "I learned so much through these", it's the only one that will ship you a free CD if you don't have a fast connection to download it "you can ask for this from the official website", personally I think it's the future of Linux.

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currently have Windows XP (god help me) and want to change to Linux. I know that Linux is open-source, but does that mean that it is free? I have no idea on the matter so I decided to consult the forums.

If u've never used any Linux Distro before, i suggest you to start with UBUNTU. The latest release is ubuntu 9.04 jaunty jackalope. You can download the Desktop CD from https://www.ubuntu.com/.

It has got a very huge forum with really helpful members.

Another thing is, Linux is not at all easier than Windows.

I suggest you to start with a dual boot configuration of ubuntu and windows, until you get familiar with linux. If you have a slow internet connection, using linux can be more difficult because all the software installations are done through internet as it include a lot of dependency satisfying. :o

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I think the online download of packages is a good thing in Ubuntu. It actually helps a lot for the beginners as they can see all the packages in a neat search able directory and install and play with any of those. And also many newbies wouldn't know how to install a package correctly (including me) so having such a system is great.I heard that to update ubuntu to newer versions we have to completely reinstall the new version. Is it true?

Edited by Spencer

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I heard that to update ubuntu to newer versions we have to completely reinstall the new version. Is it true?

I guess (or I hope) that's exactly like for other Linux (like Mandriva) updates : you boot on the distro and you choose "update install".

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you boot on the distro and you choose "update install".

So this means all the settings and files stay intact? Like all the settings and installation of apache, php, mysql, will they be there when I update? OR is it all reset?

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AFAIK, those settings are saved inside folder /home/username/
as long you don't delete that folder, your settings will remain there.

BTW, you don't need reinstall your ubuntu to upgrade your distro. but in ubuntu, you can only upgrade from the early version only. Means, you can only upgrade to jaunty from intrepid, and after you fully update your packages. if you're using hardy and want to upgrade it to jaunty, first you have to upgrade your hardy to intrepid and after that you can upgrade it to jaunty.

hope this will help you spencer :o

So this means all the settings and files stay intact? Like all the settings and installation of apache, php, mysql, will they be there when I update? OR is it all reset?

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