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Linux And Windows - Both On The Same Partition its easy


grysik

Linux: choose ZipSlack (Slackware)Windows: choose Windows 9xSteps:0) select (in your mind) one of your partitions for both OS-es (I've selected partition with filesystem FAT16)1) install Windows 9x on selected partition or copy into sectors binary image prepared before (for example using GHOST program)2) download ZipSlack Linux and decompress it on selected partition3) prepare menu for selecting OS after turning on your PC, using files autoexec.bat and config.sysyou can run your linux in this way - LINUX.BAT:@echo off\linux\loadlin \linux\vmlinuz root=/dev/hda3 rwrem where:rem loadlin.exe if file, which will load your linux into memoryrem \linux\ is directory with decompressed linux & localization of loadlin.exe filerem vmlinuz is Virtual Machine Linux ZipSlack binary image for loading into memoryrem /dev/ is directory \linux\dev\ and there are many devices handle-files for linuxrem hda3 is partition selected by U (I've selected first (means a) harddisk - hda, and third partition of this disk)rem you can (or should) select another partition !!4) download Ranish Partition Manager (PART program) on selected partition (VERY USEFULL THING)it is usefull for choosing partition from you want to start system (load to memory and running it from there)HAVE FUN


Twistit

Its nice to know this, but why would i put linux and windows on one partition? and.. this doesnt work with xp btw.. xp loves nfts.. and linux often hates it.


grysik

I don't use Windows XP, because I have no control on important things in this OS.But I've written: choose Windows 9x.NTFS... Maybe will work, but I haven't tested it, because I don't use NTFS at all.Why put Linux and Windows on the same partotion ? Oh. Why not ?Now I ask U: why put Linux and Windows on different partitions ?


xboxrulz1405241485

It's safer to put Linux and Windows on different partition because especially Windows9x will corrupt FAT32. Furthermore, FAT32 doesn't support journalling. Therefore, if your computer crashes, there's no log to attempt to fix a corrupted file or the search for one will take forever. Furthermore, Windows9x will also fragment the FAT32 filesystem. Linux will have trouble operating on it when it's too fractured. That's why you should put Linux and Windows on different partitions. Plus, when Linux is on its own type of filesystem, it operates better. For example, on ReiserFS, when your computer crashes, it checks its journal. Then, it'll repair or delete the nodes that are damaged, then allow you to continue your work. Plus, these filesystems don't fracture because both Linux and the filesystem itself doesn't allow such fractures to happen.The best way is to have a partition for Linux (choose your own except ext2), another for Windows (NTFS) and another just for DATA (FAT32)I hope this answers your question.xboxrulz


Jeigh1405241495

Yea I can't see any reason for doing this other then saying that yes, I did it, weee. But from a functional standpoint it seems irrelevant, you lose all the positive aspects of having multiple partitions and don't gain anything except...well...you don't gain anything. Also the windows before xp were so annoyingly unstable with the near constant rebooting and whatnot I'd have no reason to keep windows on my computer alongside linux if my ONLY windows option was pre-xp


XIII

It's safer to put Linux and Windows on different partition because especially Windows9x will corrupt FAT32. Furthermore, FAT32 doesn't support journalling. Therefore, if your computer crashes, there's no log to attempt to fix a corrupted file or the search for one will take forever. Furthermore, Windows9x will also fragment the FAT32 filesystem. Linux will have trouble operating on it when it's too fractured. That's why you should put Linux and Windows on different partitions. Plus, when Linux is on its own type of filesystem, it operates better. For example, on ReiserFS, when your computer crashes, it checks its journal. Then, it'll repair or delete the nodes that are damaged, then allow you to continue your work. Plus, these filesystems don't fracture because both Linux and the filesystem itself doesn't allow such fractures to happen.

 

The best way is to have a partition for Linux (choose your own except ext2), another for Windows (NTFS) and another just for DATA (FAT32)

 

I hope this answers your question.

 

xboxrulz

 


It's more safer in fact to run linux only, not both of them, not windows, windows in fact hates itself even, it doesn't love NTFS or anyother file system, it hates us even

xboxrulz1405241485

lol, nicely said :Dxboxrulz


Shane2005

That's pretty neat but I don't think that I'd use it really...



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