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Your Cms Of Choice?


Little Asterisk

So, following the recent PHP vs. ASP topic (where there has also been some talk on Ruby on Rails and Python) I've decided to also make another one, where you declare your favourite Content Management System.

 

Now, since I've posted a few already in the previously mentioned topic, I'll list them here again as mahesh2k suggested:

 

1. Wordpress is probably my favourite CMS, easy-to-install, easy-to-use and has a large community behind it. It also has extensive documentation ( https://codex.wordpress.org/Main_Page ) which will be of much help when you decide to use it for your CMS of choice (believe me, you will choose it after a while)

 

2. Site Managr CMS (that's a Web 2.0 name ) - Looks like the old Wordpress, seems to have interesting features (Events, more extensive Analytics), built entirely on CodeIgniter. The Demo page ( http://forums.xisto.com/no_longer_exists/ ) is not working, unfortunately.

 

3. MediaCore Video / Podcasting CMS will be interesting to all you podcasters out there, free and "fresh out of the oven." It has features to pull data from { insert_service_name_here } to your blog, and an extensive documentation (reminds of Wordpress a bit).

 

4. Stacey App File CMS doesn't use databases for pulling content to the user but literal files and, therefore, cannot enable commenting on your blog. It's not a problem, though, because you can easily make the commenting system using a service like Disqus. Built on PHP.

 

5. I don't know, just seemed right to have five list items. Perhaps Cushy CMS, which doesn't have to be installed on your server but just uses classes to edit particular HTML elements. Not suitable for a blog. Free to use.

 

So, there you have it - five CMS examples, but I'm sure (or I hope ) you can suggest even more. What's your favourite?

 

Update, 6 hours later:

 

Of course, how did I forget...

 

6. Joomla, also an Open-source CMS, probably one of the more complicated ones to use (at least in my experience, it is). Their website seems a bit cluttered, but overall it's still an OK product.

 

7. Drupal, community plumbing. Free, but I have never used it so cannot speak for its quality. Anyone have comments?

 

8. ExpressionEngine, only its "core" version is free for personal projects (I believe), otherwise offers some cool stuff but in my opinion is not better than Wordpress. Some of the big names in Web/Print/Graphic design use it, though, like Jason Santa Maria and Veerle Piters.

 

9. Speaking of big-name designers, Elliot Jay Stocks uses a hosted solution for his blog nowadays (it used to be powered by Wordpress), called "Harmony App". He's already said a few words about it on his blog ( http://www.elliotjaystocks.com/blog/perfect-harmony/ ), but it's important to note how it now seems as if the CMS came out of beta testing. I personally don't see the future in already hosted blog solutions, but would be really happy if Elliot and Harmony App proved me wrong.

 

Update #2, est. 1 hour after previous update

 

And, of course, we also have...

 

10. Magento is cool if you intend to sell stuff on your website (that is, eCommerce). I'm not a big fan of their site (barely found pricing and all the first time there), but I think there's no better way of selling stuff on line than Magento. If you're a "skilled individual" (I think they've put it like that) you can download and manage the free version, but otherwise you're going to have to pay a subscription fee in order to receive all support. If you'd like to learn about programming for Magento, I suggest you check out a tutorial series by NetTuts where they teach you just that ( https://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/getting-started-with-magento-ecommerce--net-4223 ).

 

Update #3, est. 3 hours after previous update

 

A coincidence perhaps, but this is yet another new CMS I've found in the recent few days:

 

11. Refinery CMS is a Ruby on Rails-based CMS and a fairly fresh one for that matter. Seems to be very nice and I intend to further see how it works as I learn more about Ruby.

 

Update, 09/11

 

I'm adding a comparison engine to the list which mahesh2k suggested. Should not be used for comparisons due to some wrong stats, but it's just fine for finding a new CMS you're eager to use.

 

http://www.cmsmatrix.org/


deadmad7

My favorite is WordPress for all the reasons you mentioned. I've tried working with Mambo, Drupal and Joomla too, you could add them to your list. I'm surprised you added CushyCMS and Site Managr CMS without the Big there -- Drupal, Joomla and Wordpress.


Little Asterisk

My favorite is WordPress for all the reasons you mentioned. I've tried working with Mambo, Drupal and Joomla too, you could add them to your list. I'm surprised you added CushyCMS and Site Managr CMS without the Big there -- Drupal, Joomla and Wordpress.


Crap. I didn't think of them. Probably because I haven't had much contact with these in the past. Will add them now.

EDIT: There it is, all added.

Little Asterisk

A cool new article on "A list apart (for people who make websites)" was published just now, concerns various CMSs and similar stuff - called "Strategic Content Management:" http://alistapart.com/article/strategic-content-management


linekill

My favorite is ModX CMS, they call it a framework, but still a CMS. Been using it since 2006 and with the release of Revolution, it just get better.


k_nitin_r

Hi!WordPress is my CMS of choice, but commercially Drupal seems to be more popular. WordPress is popular as a blogging engine but has been used as a content management system on many small projects. Drupal includes performance utilities as a part of the core package and leaves out several other functionalities, such as text formatting and image uploading tools to plugins. The WordPress approach seems to make more sense, but the Drupal approach makes the system more flexible - you get to have a choice of whether to use the FCKEditor or the TinyMCE editor for text formatting, and get to choose what kind of image upload you want to have. The flexibility adds unnecessary complexity and the inclusion of plugins with the base system would have helped in alleviating the problems of novice web masters.


deadmad7

Hi!
WordPress is my CMS of choice, but commercially Drupal seems to be more popular. WordPress is popular as a blogging engine but has been used as a content management system on many small projects. Drupal includes performance utilities as a part of the core package and leaves out several other functionalities, such as text formatting and image uploading tools to plugins. The WordPress approach seems to make more sense, but the Drupal approach makes the system more flexible - you get to have a choice of whether to use the FCKEditor or the TinyMCE editor for text formatting, and get to choose what kind of image upload you want to have. The flexibility adds unnecessary complexity and the inclusion of plugins with the base system would have helped in alleviating the problems of novice web masters.

Wordpress is as flexible as Drupal too. Wordpress has 2x more plugins and a way more interesting Admin CP. Do you want to change the WYSIWYG editor? Just download a plugin and it would replace that for you. And you can get one for image upload, but the default media upload is the best. Wordpress just needs some plugin downloading and it could customize all you want, but when some plugin features get popular, the developers add the feature of the plugin in the CMS.

mahesh2k

Nice to see this thread. I have came across cushy CMS before. Then again if it's not suitable for blogging then i doubt that i need it in any way. I'm not sure how come static CMS seems to be alive these days. Yet to use ruby on rails on Xisto - Web Hosting. And i created thread for ruby on rails support or application deployment help. But it went unnoticed as usual from here. So i don't know how to get that ruby on rails CMS working here. I'll see that and will let you know about it. @Nitin, agree about drupal's complexity. I don't think it's even worth for newbies to look into such complex system.


Little Asterisk

Nice to see this thread. I have came across cushy CMS before. Then again if it's not suitable for blogging then i doubt that i need it in any way. I'm not sure how come static CMS seems to be alive these days.


Well, you know... Static CMSs are very good for people who don't want to mess around with HTML (there are LOTS of them), but do want to have control over the website's body copy at some point in time. I.e., Joe (name totally made up) has a software product. He's selling it for moths. Now, a new version comes out. He needs to change body copy to say all the new cool features in the software application. How, when he doesn't know HTML? He can't hire a new developer!! So he uses Cushy CMS and the world is back at peace.

Whoa, that was a cool story!

P.S. In fact, a lot of people even use Wordpress for a static CMS, but I also believe some people decide on not using it because it generally costs more to implement a HTML page to a PHP CMS than just adding a couple of classes to your elements...

mahesh2k

That's true. Cushy CMS has small learning curve compared to other CMS. I know that wordpress is used for the static sites.In fact many sites earlier using joomla or drupal are now migrated to wordpress for the static website content. I think maintenance and the content organization and learning curve for the user makes it easy in case of wordpress. But somehow why i feel that stacyapp is much better for the static website. I don't know i like stacy. It's simple to setup and maintain i think. Thanks for letting me know about joe, i almost thought there is some joe here in KS.


Little Asterisk

That's true. Cushy CMS has small learning curve compared to other CMS. I know that wordpress is used for the static sites.In fact many sites earlier using joomla or drupal are now migrated to wordpress for the static website content. I think maintenance and the content organization and learning curve for the user makes it easy in case of wordpress. But somehow why i feel that stacyapp is much better for the static website. I don't know i like stacy. It's simple to setup and maintain i think. Thanks for letting me know about joe, i almost thought there is some joe here in KS.


A pleasure to serve

But now, to the interesting stuff:

I found yet another CMS targeted specifically at Graphic/Print designers not comfortable with programming on the Web. It's not something I would personally ever use, but if anyone feels like that you're ready to check out OpenPortfolio:

http://forums.xisto.com/no_longer_exists/

https://sourceforge.net/projects/openportfolio/

I would not put it in the "Big three" category, but -- as it says -- OpenPortfolio isn't meant to be used by people who would know how to code a nice Wordpress/Drupal/Joomla/Something-powered website (or a HTML-coded one, for that matter).

mahesh2k

If you want to check out more interesting CMS then i suggest you to heading towards CMSmatrix. CMSmatrix is CMS comparison site. They have custom wizard for comparing the content management sites. It is one interesting tool that compares CMS in most of the essential things. Some of the features and comparison points are worth to look into. This site is created by same company who designed forummatrix and similar other sites. You should check that site for digging out more CMS. I'm sure you'll find it useful for exploring more content management systems and you can update this thread again with reviews.


Little Asterisk

If you want to check out more interesting CMS then i suggest you to heading towards CMSmatrix. CMSmatrix is CMS comparison site. They have custom wizard for comparing the content management sites. It is one interesting tool that compares CMS in most of the essential things. Some of the features and comparison points are worth to look into. This site is created by same company who designed forummatrix and similar other sites. You should check that site for digging out more CMS. I'm sure you'll find it useful for exploring more content management systems and you can update this thread again with reviews.

 

It's an OK site for seeing what all CMSs are out there, but I'm not sure about that "comparison engine" thingy. I mean, it just told me Wordpress was last updated somewhere in the middle of 2006 and that it's now in version 2.2 -- if I'm not mistaking. Now, that's no good - is it?

 

Anyhow, I'll just add it to the first post now.


web_designer

for me, i didn't use any CMS before. but when i wanted to start with a one, i made a quick search and decided that wordpress is the best to start with. and now i really feel it is the best, at least for me. it has a lot of features that make our job easier and proficient. and i think it is suitable for beginner and professional developer. therefor i know i will stick with it forever i guess .p.sthanks for this useful topic little asterisk, you always come up with good ones


Liquidized

I love Wordpress, Seditio, and i don't remember the other one but it was some kind of Manga Script. Wordpress has tons of plugins and themes which lets it go beyond actions of just blogging. Seditio is fast, compatible with mobile viewers, simple, and has tons of plugins. Though it's more so of a forum, you can find tons of uses. The Manga script was just awesome because it was simple and mobile compatible (I was currently making Manga for the Sony Playstation Portable)... So yeah.... The Manga Script Technically isn't a CMS but technically is... It was more like a plug and play. No sql database required.


Little Asterisk

p.sthanks for this useful topic little asterisk, you always come up with good ones


You're welcome web_designer. Of course I always come up with good topics, because I'm smart!

Naah, I'm not. I just write things which interest me and then see if other people feel that way, too.

Anyhow, as I said - Wordpress is the best CMS for me, too (so far), but I posted this topic mainly to see if there are any other interesting unexplored CMSs people use. It would be interesting to see if some "Wordpress-killer" exists out there, definitely.

web_designer

I just write things which interest me and then see if other people feel that way, too.
Anyhow, as I said - Wordpress is the best CMS for me, too (so far), but I posted this topic mainly to see if there are any other interesting unexplored CMSs people use. It would be interesting to see if some "Wordpress-killer" exists out there, definitely.


and you are right, wordpress is the most powerful and common use CMS till now. mostly because it is free, updated regularly from time to time and not complicated. i remember when i decided to use a CMS for my blog, i thought dealing with CMS is a piece of cake. but later when i read a bout it, i found out that to get a unique look, we should have our own theme. and that wasn't fun in the beginning but i liked the idea and couldn't hold myself from learning more and more. it is really an interesting CMS, and has a lot of capabilities to enhance our work. therefor i love to use it, and i recommended anyone to use it too.

mahesh2k

Habari CMS is not in the list i guess. Some wordpress users wanted to purge the complexity of the CMS and came up with this CMS. I don't know how much useful it is but i just checked up with some of the old bloggers. This CMS has everything that wordpress has and plus few more things. But they are keeping eye on less complexities. So i guess many functionality needs to be plugged rather than in features of CMS officially. If you're using XAMPP or uniform server then do check this project out and let me know how it works.There are many other wordpress forks. I'll post as i find them out.


Little Asterisk

It's pre-hosted CMS day today! And what I mean by that is, I'm going to post a couple of CMSs which are already hosted for you and you don't have to install them on your Server. Appropriate for easy stuff.

 

1. Blogger is a service bought by Google a couple of years ago which gives you easy and quick blog setup, very basic templates and a complicated documentation (!), but there are a few OK templates available out there. Most people regard it just as a... Well, a simple, simple blogging platform for personal purposes. Free for any use.

 

2. (Get) Harmony App, which is used by Elliot Jay Stocks and that's how I found out about it =). There's an article about it on hist Blog but, more importantly, I think it's out of its beta phase currently and you can freely use it. Multiple pricing options, but it's not free.

 

3. Wordpress.com, unlike Wordpress.org is pre-hosted and you can quickly set it up. Depending on your preferences, you can consider it either better or worse than Blogspot. Why worse? For any additional modifying of your blog, you have to pay a price. Even for assigning a custom domain name! Also, because it's built around PHP you can't edit anything but the CSS - and you also have to pay for that! Casual blogging, although some bigger companies use it (I believe even Ted.com is on Wordpress.com).

 

4. Deploy CMS - Honestly, I'm not sure if this one is pre-hosted because there's very little info on their page, but I believe it will be. Be sure to check it out once Deploy CMS goes out of Public Beta (P.S. If you're interested, you can also apply for the beta and test it out. They'll supposedly be giving free stuff to their beta testers!)


Spudd

I'm a big fan of memHT, personally. (https://www.memht.com/) It may come pre-installed with a bunch of modules that you won't want, but at least that way you have a nice wide selection of modules to start with, and don't have to go through a load of addons. Another thing I really like about it is that it has a built in forum that actually looks and feels somewhat like a typical phpBB or Invision board, as opposed to some CMSes that have very minimalistic forums, or even none at all. It's very easy to customize, and very fun to use. It's a little bit bloated in terms of features, which I know some of you might not like, but it's great if you don't have a lot of PHP and MySQL knowledge.



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