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Paper Thin Tv Screens


Cerebral Stasis

Another use for this stuff as wallpaper would be to make the interior of your house look like anything (for example, your walls could project images so that it looks like you're in a cabin by a beautiful lake). Maybe pick-your-weather window blinds.It's certainly a gigantic step forward, to put it mildly, but there's still the issue of the processing unit, power, etc. that I'm sure won't be paper-thin.


magiccode9

yeah, that's great, their usage are limitless, i like it too. but, how about recycled problems. is that will affect the earth. if so, may be that come later would be best.as the product is low price, low cost, that would be resulted in environment problem. is it right?


FLaKes

Wow!! Awesome!!! Yeah, Im gonna get a couple of these, and instead of having still pictures in my walls I can have video!! and, imagine all the things that can be done with this technology, Did anyone ever see the movie, I forgot its name but it was directed by Steven Spielberg, and Tom Cruise was the main actor. They had tvs on the cereal boxes!! Marketing is going to have lots of advantage with this technology, I think it will really be a huge revolution, but sorry, I guess I got a little bit excited, but thanks for the info!


believer

Did anyone ever see the movie, I forgot its name but it was directed by Steven Spielberg, and Tom Cruise was the main actor. They had tvs on the cereal boxes!!

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It is Minority Report.

 

Yes options are limitless, one technology that caught my attention on that same movide too is the visual or laser thing that can create an image or virtual individual that seems real, I love to have that in my room,


Cerebral Stasis

as the product is low price, low cost, that would be resulted in environment problem.    is it right?

Not necessarily. It all depends on what it's made up of. If it's just a simple plastic stubstance, it may be possible to recycle it, and if it has any organic composition (like OLEDs do), it would decompose over time.

I don't see how having paper-screens will be any more of a problem than having plain paper; I'm sure they'll burn.

sleepy

ace that cool but bout if you rip it lol and another thing i want it bet they still cost loads though


emilyfoat

wow thats amazing


Cerebral Stasis

ace that cool but bout if you rip it

Although it may be as thin as paper, it certainly won't be a filmsy as paper (for example, plastic that is the thickness of paper is difficult to rip by accident). Depending on what it's made of, I'm sure it will be quite durable.

XRated

Wow , that's amazing lol i need me one now . That would eliminate the space, shippings cost, moving space and tons of things , even at low cost's wow just amazing , id say these Television providers should get there hand's on this technology or im guessing they won't be in business long


Cerebral Stasis

By "television providers" I assume you mean those who manufacture televisions, such as Sony. This technology isn't ready to be released on the public market, and only those with enough money will be able to afford it at first (meaning that, although it may be cheap, companies will sell them for big bucks to gain as much profit as possible before they begin to become a widely used thing, at which time prices will drop, such has been the case with all new technologies). I have read in a few articles that they should begin being used at least by 2007 or so.


sangdukseo

oh baby get me one of these. A t.v. that could span your wall and cost next to nothing. Oh man oh man hurry up technology. I first heard about this at a tech expo in virginia and wowa, the previews of the technology were awesome. This is brand new sci-fi type of technology in this decade probably. YES, finally something that's really cool.


Robbie

thats unbelievable i cudnt imagine walking in to the nearest shop and seeing loads of mini tv's on baked bean tins? wow i gotta see me one of them


Chameleon

First thing I'd do is wall over my window and put some of this stuff up (anyone seen the movie Treasure Planet? raining outside so she flips a switch and its a beautiful sunset); hook it up to my computer and have all the walls in my room inc. roof with this stuff on it and just throw some artwork up, moving pictures... have my entire room my desktop *stops and thinks about that for a minute...* how about putting it up on one side of a door and having a micro camera on the other side... sort of like one-way glass, you can see everything outside the door as if it weren't there...very trippy technology, I want some (just like every one else )


neoworldgraphics

I think it is amazing that they can make a huge Television so thin... paper thinn. My friend said he had oneand he says it is awlsome! I wish I had one but I am happy with what I got... But all that technology in something about an inch thick!!! I dont know how they do it. It must have taken a decade. I wish I could make something so thin like that... Its just so amazing!!!


cardude

I think that would be great! I want one of those! That even beats a projector tv (one where a projector projects the image onto a white screen on the wall)!


Cerebral Stasis

I think it is amazing that they can make a huge Television so thin... paper thinn. My friend said he had oneand he says it is awlsome! I wish I had one but I am happy with what I got... But all that technology in something about an inch thick!!! I dont know how they do it. It must have taken a decade. I wish I could make something so thin like that... Its just so amazing!!!

Although I could be wrong, I'm pretty positive that these paper-thin televisions haven't yet been released on the commercial market. Therefore, your friend is either lying or is mistaken (maybe he thinks you meant a thin-screen LCD or plasma television?). The television technology that this thread is talking about would be much smaller than an inch thick; paper-thin. As for it taking a decade, technically, one could say it has taken centuries (if one considers every major and/or minor invention that lead to the television a part of "making" it). If you mean with just the concept of using this paper-thin screen technology, I doubt it's been around, or at least not widely known of/studied for an entire decade; technology works faster than that, and one must keep in mind the tools avaliable ten years ago (when Windows 95 was the new thing).

Compute

Paper Thin TV's, Hard to believe they can make it that small. I though Plasmas were small. But I would just like to know how do you put cable on that thing... Strange where all the wires are... Is this a wireless paper think TV which has cable wirelessly. if yes I?m getting myself 1 .Nice find.


Cerebral Stasis

It can't be completely wireless; there has to be some connections to transfer the energy to where it needs to go. It could, however, use very thin circuit relays (like those in a keyboard, if you've ever seen one taken apart). There are certainly ways to transfer the electricity without needing thick wiring, but it would need some kind of controlling boards, but they wouldn't have to be inside or even very close to the actual "screen" itself.


fusionx

Maybe not paper thin tv's but paper thin screens. If you were to say tv there is alot of stuff missing. But this is great for gadgets etc. will start getting smaller and there won't be so expensive as they usually are. Does anyone know the quality of this thin screen? If they are good then we may see some great advancements in the future.


Cerebral Stasis

There was an image posted in the topic of this thread:

 

 

After a bit of searching, I've found this one as well:

 

 

It looks pretty clear, but if you wish to find more images, you could always do a Google search, although from what I've seen, it looks like these two may be the only images of Siemens' paper-thin screen technology currently circulating the Internet.



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