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Desile Cars Can Run On Olive Oil! did u know that


Plenoptic

Concerning water and wind electricity, true it's free and it's renewable, but it's not always avaliable (for winds die down and rivers dry up).

As for the water we could use some of the ocean's water but we would have to filter out the salt and stuff so they would put a cost on that. The thing about wind is that once you get enough power in wind to get it started as you drive there is more wind because you are flying through the air. If the car can hold the energy of the wind and use it to get started that is all it needs. It could take a bit of research but I think eventually it'll work. It might be a little more expensive car though but I don't know. It would take a bit of experimenting.

Cerebral Stasis

No, you'll never get enough energy out of the wind power being absorbed by any turbine on a moving car to make up for any energy lost. The extra drag and such would equal the energy out so that you'd be getting no advantage.As for the water, the problem is that, aside from currents, there is very little movement in the ocean water; waves only disturb the surface.


DeveloperX

Some interesting facts about Biodiesel (Vegetable Oil).

 

Biodiesel is produced from renewable raw materials.

 

Biodiesel is free from sulphur (< 0,001 %).

 

Biodiesel greatly reduces carbon emissions

(by up to approx. 50 %)

 

Biodiesel releases approximately the same amount of CO2 during

its combustion as the rapeseed has absorbed during its growth

(so with an almost neutral Carbon Cycle).

 

Biodiesel does not contain any benzene or other aromatic compounds.

 

Biodiesel reduces hydrocarbon emissions (in particular the emission of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons).

 

Biodiesel is easily biodegradable with no hazard to soil or groundwater in the case of accidents.

 

Biodiesel is not classified as a hazardous substance (Flash Point approx. 170?C).

 

Biodiesel has excellent lubrication properties which reduce engine wear.

 

Biodiesel is an environmentally friendly alternative to mineral diesel

 

This information from

biodiesel.de


DeveloperX

information from

Bellonna

 

Biodiesel is exempt from diesel tax through special legislation in several European countries, including Germany, France, and Sweden. It has therefore become competitively priced and is sold in large quantities. Raising energy crops such as rapeseed, which is possible in Norway, yields a protein-rich fiber as the main product, and oil as a by-product. In other words, there is a great potential in biodiesel for development in both the farming and renewable energy industries.

 

Pure biodiesel in Norway is currently not taxed. This is because the government wishes to make it easier to introduce renewable biofuel to the Norwegian market. Using biodiesel reduces the exhaust of particles/soot by 40% and eliminates emissions of SO2 .

 

For now, biodiesel that is blended in mineral oil is taxable if the oil is considered to be mineral oil. This is a result of the government's resolution on taxing mineral oil. The Ministry of Finance and Customs -(FIN) has determined that a mixture of up to 5% Rapeseed Methylic Ether (RME) in mineral oil does not result in the oil losing its character of being mineral oil (letter to Hydro Texaco AS, Nov. 23, 1998). The government has therefore taxed blended biodiesel accordingly.

 

It is not feasible to run a vehicle on pure biodiesel today, as there is no fuel distribution network. To develop such a network would be costly and require major changes in today's infrastructure, which means that allowing biodiesel to go untaxed is not enough of an incentive to encourage further development of this alternative fuel. A step towards achieving environmentally-sound fuel would be to blend biodiesel with mineral oil, as is done in France. Biodiesel is just as renewable, and has just as low emissions per volume, regardless of whether it is used in its pure form or if it is mixed with diesel. This means that the environmental benefits are the same per liter for both pure and blended biodiesel, since they are basically the same, so to tax blended biodiesel is contradictory to the basic principle of greater tax on fuels that pollute more.


CrazyShooter

information from

Bellonna

 

Biodiesel is exempt from diesel tax through special legislation in several European countries, including Germany, France, and Sweden. It has therefore become competitively priced and is sold in large quantities. Raising energy crops such as rapeseed, which is possible in Norway, yields a protein-rich fiber as the main product, and oil as a by-product. In other words, there is a great potential in biodiesel for development in both the farming and renewable energy industries.

 

Pure biodiesel in Norway is currently not taxed. This is because the government wishes to make it easier to introduce renewable biofuel to the Norwegian market. Using biodiesel reduces the exhaust of particles/soot by 40% and eliminates emissions of SO2 .

 

For now, biodiesel that is blended in mineral oil is taxable if the oil is considered to be mineral oil. This is a result of the government's resolution on taxing mineral oil. The Ministry of Finance and Customs -(FIN) has determined that a mixture of up to 5% Rapeseed Methylic Ether (RME) in mineral oil does not result in the oil losing its character of being mineral oil (letter to Hydro Texaco AS, Nov. 23, 1998). The government has therefore taxed blended biodiesel accordingly.

 

It is not feasible to run a vehicle on pure biodiesel today, as there is no fuel distribution network. To develop such a network would be costly and require major changes in today's infrastructure, which means that allowing biodiesel to go untaxed is not enough of an incentive to encourage further development of this alternative fuel. A step towards achieving environmentally-sound fuel would be to blend biodiesel with mineral oil, as is done in France. Biodiesel is just as renewable, and has just as low emissions per volume, regardless of whether it is used in its pure form or if it is mixed with diesel. This means that the environmental benefits are the same per liter for both pure and blended biodiesel, since they are basically the same, so to tax blended biodiesel is contradictory to the basic principle of greater tax on fuels that pollute more.

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Allthought this is true it is also illigeal. My dad ustu do it and his car smelt of oil. It was pretty funny at the time

 

 

 




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